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20130204
20130212
STATION
MSNBC 4
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CSPAN 1
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English 12
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
the debt ceiling. if republicans had gone into this issue and said they would not raise the debt ceiling unless they got cuts, there would have lost that the raid at the end. big loss that debate. john boehner and paul rand did a great job together. you cannot govern from that office, you but you have to be very careful about high-profile last-minute negotiations. i've worked in the white house and three administrations. the president has a tremendous institutional advantage in these kinds of fights. what republicans have to do is avoid these fights, the straps that they are laying. provide an alternative through passing legislation, just to show this is how they would govern if they had the powers of the presidency and the senate. and be careful. there are some rough edges. host: some are not strategy as far as moving the debt ceiling ahead. guest: if they had gone ahead with it, it would have been politically cataclysmic. it was the worst percival -- worst possible ground to make their point. president obama 1. i think it's absolutely crucial for the future of the country that you cann
steps they want to put in place to get more people back to work. >> fiscal cliff, the debt ceiling, immigration he said there's room but, look, republicans need to get religion on this. do you expect a similar tone in the state of the union? >> he has a limited amount of time. they feel they have a so-called m mandate from their victory not losing the senate. i think it's kind of full speed ahead for the president right now. he's going to go as bold as he can go, limited amount of time. i think i disagree a little bit on the economy. i think it's a course correction for him. i feel he's maybe second-guessing, not talking about the economy during his inaugural speech, now maybe i should have talked about that. >> which is fascinating because if you look at the first term in a lot of ways, you know, he started off -- you had a republican party that was largely kind of in the doldrums and he started off with economic stimulus and health care which united the party in some way. is he -- is he smart to refocus on the economy, jim? >> yes. >> and probably the more important question, is
. that was an exchange for republicans agreeing to raise the debt ceiling. and january 1st, the fiscal cliff deal, decided to push it off for 60 days and now here we are. under the terms of the earlier budget deals, now must find $85 billion somewhere by march 1st otherwise pentagon spending will shrink. and medicare will take a 2% reduction. the president and democrats prefer an option that raises more money by closing tax loopholes. republicans want to stick with spending cuts saying they've already agreed to tax hikes. 448,000 jobs in dc, maryland and virginia could be affected. concerned about the impact on our economy. >> sequestration will hurt not only the defense side but the nondefense side. my committee funds the fbi. there will probably be furloughs at the fbi and the national cancer institute, nih. defense and nondefense. >> that hurts the broader economy. people are concerned about their jobs and don't know the impact on their bank accounts. that holds them from spending on movies and restaurants and theaters. thinks he has time to buy a little bit more of a deal. let republicans and
seems to have pulled the republicans' fangs with respect to the debt ceiling. that's probably the big risk that the market was worried about. >> you made recent changes to your 2013 allocation strategy. some of them are interesting. high volatility u.s. large caps and micro cap stocks. it would seem you're increasing the beta place. when you say u.s. large cap volatile stocks, what do you mean by that? >> well, we believe that there's an evolution in the asset classes that investors are going to be tapping into in the next decade. you know, if you look back over the last 20 years, people spent a lot of time arguing, what was the value stock, what was a growth stock. and a lot of times it was in the eye of the beholder. volatility is a much more objective mesh yasure of what a stock is. you can do very good long term, 80 and 90-year analysis of what this asset class means. and right now, we show high volatility stocks have been beaten down very, very much in the rally, relative to low volatility, sort of bond proxy stocks. that suggests to us that they're one of the best opportunities
. the guy who helped craft the debt ceiling plan. when he puts out that budget that is the document republicans have to run on the next two years because it has severe spending cuts on the domestic side because they have to balance the budget in ten years, a mighty task because they don't want to raise taxes. >> he has no interest in the sheer grind of campaigning. it's hard to see him having what it takes to run for president in 2016. is that even in his mind? is that a possibility for him? >> i don't think he's ever rule it out having been the veep last time and having national statutostature and i do think you have to wapt badly and willing to go for two years that state to state, talking to folks at the grassroots and i don't think he really likes that. likes the idea of spending some time with his family and work the halls of congress. the next two years are about austerity for the republican party. that would be really tough to run for president trying to partially privatize medicare and cut domestic spending across the board. >> quickly, paul ryan, does he have what it takes
. if republicans had time to this issue and said, you know, were not going to raise the debt ceiling unless at a certain amount of cuts, they would've caved in the end, would've been disastrous, much like what the fiscal cliff and i think boehner and right together did a very nice job convincing republicans that you can't govern from the house, but sure to be careful about getting into these high-profile, high-stakes, last-minute negotiations with the president. it worked in the white house, i worked in three administrations. they have a tremendous institutional at vantage in this kind of bias. i think what republicans have to do is avoid these sites come at the straps the democrats and president obama are laying, provide an alternative to passing legislation, just to show them this is how we recover if we have the powers of the presidency and the senate and to be careful and frankly the rougher edges republicans sometimes have. >> host: some republicans aren't happy sr is moving ahead. >> guest: i think if they had gone ahead, it would have been cataclysmic for the republican party. i say
sequestration or the debt ceiling. they are still doing that. the president was successful when he went to the american people, not just rallying democrats, but rallying the people who say let's get on with it, let's try to balance the budget, and the difficulty we have here now is the republicans are just talking about cutting programs, and they have targeted social security, medicaid, and medicare, and the president is saying we have to reform these systems, but we still need more revenue, and this is a worry that they just refuse to discuss. i don't see how you can ignore revenues if you talk about a budget. >> sir, if you will, we look at the time clock ahead of us, we have the state of the union coming up next week, but it's the sequester at the end of the month, the beginning of march, that everybody is worried about and what those cuts will mean in terms of defense spending and what it will mean to low-income families in this country. just a short time ago leon panetta was asked directly about the sequester in his hearing. i want to play it for everybody. >> we've implemented a f
. it gets sort of mini-half deals. >> that's right. i mean, the sequester, the debt ceiling, fiscal cliff, all these things are not so much real problems as they are manufactured partisan problems. but underneath them, you have this real problem which is basically the republicans won the debate on taxes, and the democrats have won the debate on the safety net. and as a result, that's sort of the deficit that we have. and the question is how can we solve it? and history suggests economic growth is the best way, but this deficit is also big enough in the long term that it's probably not going to be enough. and we need some combination of spending cuts and tax increases as well. >> yeah, how do we make that happen, sam? >> i was going to say, part of the problem is the tax revenue problem, which is that you don't have enough people making good incomes, paying good taxes, which is used to fund the social safety net that we value very highly. but it's also a health spending problem in that we spend a of d a lot of that's end of life health as well. one of the curious things about the health c
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)